WDDTY – The evidence for homeopathy (WARNING: Accurate statement detected)

It seems the WDDTY team do sometimes read what sceptics write. I’m not quite sure how this happens, since McTaggart is prone to blocking and deleting the least criticism, but apparently it does. Witness this little exercise in misinformation, which turned up in a slightly reworded and longer form in the Nov 2013 issue.

The evidence for homeopathy

Homeopathy is a nonsense, at least according to scientists and sceptics. Yet Indian doctors are using it every day to treat cancer—and now the US government is interested

Doctors call it “nonsense on stilts”, and professors of medicine have been bullying government and health authorities to stop offering it on the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), while scientists say it is implausible, if not impossible, as it breaks every law of science they know.

Homeopathy is everyone’s favourite whipping boy, and if it does clear up a snuffly cold or minor headache, it’s all due to the placebo effect: it’s just mind over matter, and people merely think it’s making them better. Any active ingredient in a homeopathic remedy is diluted sometimes thousands of times, so any effect must be entirely in someone’s imagination.

That makes perfect sense,…

Let’s take that apart, shall we?

The evidence for homeopathy

Homeopathy is a nonsense, at least according to scientists and sceptics.

I hear echoes of that reality-denialist cry “You and your science!” that galvanised me into actively seeking out and debunking anti-science fuckwittery wherever it may lurk and fester. Funny how pro-SCAM whackjobs are quick to laud science when they think they can use it to support their favourite money-making placebo though. Here’s a classic example: five occurrences of the word “science” on a page selling a form of Thinking Happy Thoughts Really Hard, touted by one… Lynne McTaggart. Funny, that.

Yet Indian doctors are using it every day to treat cancer—and now the US government is interested

Yeeees. Indian homeopaths (they are not doctors) may be using homeopathy to treat cancer, but that doesn’t mean it actually does any good. The USA is not exactly renowned for always letting reality prevail over fuckwitted dogma, either, so even if the two claims were more than fallacious arguments from popularity and authority, they still wouldn’t mean dick.

Doctors call it “nonsense on stilts”, and professors of medicine have been bullying government and health authorities to stop offering it on the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), while scientists say it is implausible, if not impossible, as it breaks every law of science they know.

The doctors are correct, the scientists are correct and the professor in question (it’s an obvious attack on Edzard Ernst, who has studied homeopathy and other fringe therapies for years) hasn’t been bullying anybody, merely stating the truth. In fact, he has rather been the victim of bullying, notably from homeopaths trying to smear and discredit him.

Homeopathy is everyone’s favourite whipping boy, and if it does clear up a snuffly cold or minor headache,

… which it doesn’t …

it’s all due to the placebo effect: it’s just mind over matter, and people merely think it’s making them better. Any active ingredient in a homeopathic remedy is diluted sometimes thousands of times, so any effect must be entirely in someone’s imagination.

Bloody hell, I think I’ve just found an accurate statement about homeopathy in WDDTY. I claim my prize.

That makes perfect sense,…

Yes, Lynne, it does. And funnily enough, it’s the power of the imagination you claim to harness in your Intention dingbattery. Is it just me, or are you trying to have your cake and eat it, while selling it a slice at a time?

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