Tag Archives: Quack diagnoses

100 ways to live to 100: Your healthy children

Part of a series on WDDTY’s “free” advertorial report “100 ways to live to 100

Your healthy children

It’s not clear how your children’s health could help you live to 100, though if you follow WDDTY’s anti-vaccine advice you certainly need them to be as healthy as possible to minimise the chance of death or permanent harm from vaccine preventable disease.

41 Get fit before you conceive

Work with a doctor experienced in preconception nutrition who will check your nutritional status and help you correct any deficiencies, hidden infections, heavy-metal toxic overload and the like, all of which can contribute to infertility and pregnancy loss. Contact Foresight for their complete programme of preconceptual care (www.foresight-preconception.org.uk). The organization reports a 90 per cent success rate of healthy babies born to the nearly 1,600 couples who completed the full Foresight programme, many with a previous history of lost pregnancy or infertility.

This is  a blatant sales pitch. Foresight’s website scores easily 8 ducks on the Quackometer – anything inspired by a “psychiatrist-with-vision” can’t score less!

The chances of anyone living a normal middle-class British lifestyle having “heavy metal toxic overload” are vanishingly small. Unless you ask a chelation quack like Dr. John Mansfield, a member of the WDDTY editorial panel. And most British women conceive without any special measures, so don’t throw your money down the drain until you’ve at least satisfied yourself you have a problem – and if that is the case, be sure to consult only a doctor who is registered and licensed to practice in the UK. The GMC has an online register which is a tad cumbersome but allows you to check for a name and verify that if, say, they qualified before 1976 at Guy’s, they are not licensed to practice in the UK.

In short: the heading is misleading. WDDTY are promoting quackery before conception. Avoid like the plague.

42 If you are pregnant, minimize your exposure to prenatal tests like ultrasound scans

Scans have been linked to low birth weights, delayed speech and dyslexia. Unless a problem is suspected, wait till after your baby is born to take its picture

“Scans have been linked” is classic WDDTY weasel words. Of course women with red flags for suspected problems will be referred for scans to see if the baby is developing normally. That doesn’t mean the scan has any effect on development.

Ultrasound is safe, cheap, and reassuring especially to the anxious primagravida. It can also pick up serious defects such as cleft lip and palate and prepare parents for informed choices at an early stage.

Some forms of diagnostics lead to many false positives and undesirable outcomes. Antenatal ultrasound is not one of these. It is an entirely reasonable check for developmental abnormalities, which is why virtually every doctor and midwife recommends it.

43 Breastfeed

Give your child this lifelong gift and breastfeed for as long as possible—at least one year, according to the WHO. In addition to providing the perfect food and the full complement of essential fatty acids, for your child, it also protects against allergies and helps improve vision and IQ. Resist the suggestions of experts to add supplemental feeds unless something is clearly wrong. The baby is usually getting enough if allowed to feed on demand.

Can anybody name the doctors who “don’t tell you” this? It’s entirely mainstream. Unfortunately, it is also so deeply embedded in the middle-class psyche that women who find they can’t breastfeed, for whatever reason, may feel bullied and inadequate (warning: Daily Mail). This is not just tabloid hysteria.

44 Get informed about vaccination

There’s no such thing as a totally safe vaccine; official organizations like the US National Academy of Sciences and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tacitly acknowledge that all vaccines have the potential to kill or cause serious harm. Assess every last jab with the following questions: How necessary is this vaccine? How effective? How safe? Especially question vaccinations against illnesses that are rare or generally not life-threatening in healthy, well-nourished children. This includes the MMR (measles–mumps–rubella), cervical cancer, Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) and meningitis C vaccines.

Informed consent is good, as long as the information is reliable. WDDTY’s information on vaccines is grossly unreliable. Its claims for harm are massively inflated, its anti-vaccination agenda was established from the very outset and no story about vaccines has ever been published in any edition of WDDTY, as far as we can tell, which is accurate, positive, or correctly reflects the balance of risk and harm. A recent story claimed that “Andrew Wakefield was right”. He wasn’t. A story in this very issue repeated the vicious anti-vaccine lie that HPV vaccine has seriously harmed 1,700 girls. It hasn’t.

The best source for accurate information about vaccines is, and always has been, your family doctor. The implication that doctors claim vaccines are 100% safe or 100% effective is false, official documents have never supported this. they are, however, extremely safe and at least very effective.

Measles, pertussis (whooping-cough), Hib and other vaccine-preventable disease are killers. The anti-vaccine agenda is denialism at its most selfish, relying on others taking the tiny risk to provide the herd immunity that allows anti-vaccinationists to claim that vaccine preventable diseases are rare anyway.

45 Suspect allergies first

If your child has any chronic problems like earache, eczema, bowel problems or hyperactivity, suspect food/chemical allergies, and get them identified and treated.

Allergies are more common and more diverse than many parents think, and less common and less diverse than WDDTY would have you believe. If your child has a chronic health problem there are three very important things to remember:

  1. Intolerance is not allergy.
  2. Many children grow out of both intolerance and allergy.
  3. Avoid any allergy diagnostic services that claim to find yeast overgrowth, leaky gut and the like, and instead ask your GP for a referral to the local NHS allergy clinic.

Allergies, and chronic disease generally, are fertile hunting ground for quacks. Just look at the back pages of WDDTY.

46 Avoid plastic toys containing phthalates

These chemicals have clear evidence of causing ‘feminization’ and abnormal gonadal development in boys.

So all the boys who have ever played with Action Man are eunuchs? Get real. But don’t worry, the problematic pthalates have been banned from toys since the end of last century.

47 Be wary of giving your child unnecessary chemicals and drugs like antibiotics for benign conditions

Antibiotics have been linked to childhood diabetes; cold and flu medications can be deadly in small children; and steroids are responsible for many paediatric deaths. Avoid medications like salbuterol for asthma—it doesn’t work and can make the condition worse.

Dangerous nonsense. The basis on which WDDTY claims that cold medications are deadly is primarily evidence that you should only use the dose and type of medicine indicated for a child of the correct age; the adverse effects tend to be overdoses from giving infants doses designed for older children or even adults. Accidental and deliberate overdoses are both included.

WDDTY’s long-standing agenda against antibiotics is more puzzling: as a class of drugs, antibiotics have saved more lives than any other except perhaps vaccines. Oh, wait…

Past stories indicate that WDDTY believe you should allow your children to suffer ruptured eardrums rather than give them antibiotics for ear infections. Because natural. This may qualify as child abuse.

48 Avoid Ritalin and other drugs for hyperactivity

They can increase cardiovascular risk and trigger new psychiatric symptoms plus sudden death. If your kids are hyperactive, suspect sugar or processed foods. Artificial colours like tartrazine used in juice drinks or ‘squashes’ and salicylate foods can all cause hyperactivity and attention deficit.

Ritalin was never as widely used in the UK as in the US (where drugs are marketed direct to patients). NICE maintains a useful database of evidence. And this is what an evidence-based discussion might look like. Do you see how it includes both risks and benefits, unlike WDDTY?

In the UK, Ritalin is used only for serious cases, not for self-diagnosed or questionable diagnoses. As usual, it’s safe to say that your doctor is probably better informed on the risk / benefit balance for your child than some shrill anti-medicine harridan.

49 Avoid toothpastes with fluoride, and filter your water if it’s fluoridated

High levels of fluoride in drinking water can dramatically lower IQ in children, say Harvard scientists—enough to cause learning difficulties in children who already have lowish IQ.26

Reference 26: Environ Health Perspect, 2012; 120: 1362–8  Developmental fluoride neurotoxicity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Choi AL, Sun G, Zhang Y, Grandjean P.

And by high levels, they mean levels dramatically above the safe limits in drinking water. No water company adds these levels of fluoride.

It’s astonishing that as we approach the half-centenary of Dr. Strangelove, cranks are still repeating Major T. J. “King” Kong’s fulmination against fluoridation of water. The provable effect is a reduction in dental caries. And that’s it.

As always in medicine, anything given to healthy patients is subject to much more scrutiny than a drug given to the sick. Vaccines are another example. The evidence of safety has to be much more robust than for , say, a new antibiotic, because the risks of side-effects are offset only by potential benefits. Fluoridation of water (and toothpaste) has been studied intensely for a long time. There is no credible evidence of harm. Fluoridation is safe.

There is no credible reason at all to avoid fluoridated toothpaste. It might be wise not to snack on it, though.

50 Throw kids outdoors

Most infants and toddlers have low levels of vitamin D, some with levels below those needed to maintain and grow healthy bones.27 One school of thought maintains that by ‘protecting’ children against exposure to dirt and germs, we are inadvertently destroying their immune system’s ability to respond appropriately to infection and other stimuli. Diseases like eczema are far less prevalent in children who live in less sanitized conditions like farms and rural communities.28

Reference 27: Pediatrics, 2010; 125: 627–32 Adherence to vitamin D recommendations among US infants. Perrine CG, Sharma AJ, Jefferds ME, Serdula MK, Scanlon KS.

Reference 28: Clin Exp Allergy, 1999; 29: 28–34 Prevalence of hay fever and allergic sensitization in farmer’s children and their peers living in the same rural community. SCARPOL team. Swiss Study on Childhood Allergy and Respiratory Symptoms with Respect to Air Pollution. Braun-Fahrländer C, Gassner M, Grize L, Neu U, Sennhauser FH, Varonier HS, Vuille JC, Wüthrich B.

The idea that being in the outdoors is good for you is plausible and uncontroversial. WDDTY’s obsession with vitamin D, the idea that sunlight is “natural” and so “safe”, and their bizarre agenda against sunscreen, combine to make nonsense out of sense.

Australia has one of the best developed networks for surveillance of skin cancer. Guess what? Rural Victorians (those who get “thrown outdoors”) are 24% more likely to be diagnosed with melanoma.

So even when WDDTY advice has “truthinessW”, it turns out to be questionable and potentially dangerous, because WDDTY cares only about what WDDTY cares about, whereas medical advice usually cares about everything.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Treatment wars: Chronic Lying Disease

Chronic Lyme Disease
In 2007, WDDTY took part in prolonging a hoax that is still going on, perhaps unwittingly whipping up support for a condition – and a potentially harmful pharmaceutical treatment – that was legislated into legitimacy by politicians against all available scientific evidence.

“Chronic” Lyme disease is a fertile hunting ground for quacks in the US, and increasingly elsewhere. It has been extensively studied, and there is no credible evidence to support it. That doesn’t stop people from claiming it as the cause of a variety of conditions including – naturally! – autism, and pursuing quack treatments, the most common of which are long-term antibiotics.

Self-diagnosed “sufferers” circulate details of “Lyme-literate” doctors who will prescribe these treatments. And in some places they cannot be stopped, because they successfully lobbied for legal protection.

All this is apparently fine, because it’s alternative.

Continue reading Treatment wars: Chronic Lying Disease